University of California, Riverside

 

Jennifer Doyle Jennifer Doyle Professor of English

Topics: Soccer
Title IX
American Literature
Art

Preferred Media: Print, Radio, Video

Languages Spoken: French

Contact Card

E-mail: jennifer.doyle@ucr.edu
Tel: (951) 827-7844

Media Contact: Bettye Miller
E-mail: bettye.miller@ucr.edu
Tel: (951) 827-7847

Biography

Jennifer Doyle has written about the politics of emotion in contemporary art, art controversies, and the politics of gender and sexuality in art and literature. She has published essays on the following artists: Andy Warhol, Thomas Eakins, Tracey Emin, performance artists Vaginal Davis and Ron Athey, Carrie Mae Weems and James Luna. She has also published essays on work by Louisa May Alcott, Herman Melville and Edith Wharton. Her art writing has been published in Frieze and Art Journal, as well as on Art21.org. She wrote ablog, From a Left Wing, about the cultural politics of soccer from 2007 to 2013. In 2013 she started a new blog, The Sport Spectacle. Her writing on sports has appeared in The New York Times, The Guardian, FoxSoccer.com, as well as in Social Text, Cabinet, and World Literature Today. She co-hosted a daily podcast on the 2010 World Cup for KPFK.

On Soccer

Professor Doyle is available to speak about World Cup issues, women’s soccer, and disparities in resources for and media coverage of women’s soccer.

On Title IX

Doyle is available to speak about Title IX issues, including sports,  sexual harassment, and school policies.

On American Literature

Doyle has published essays on work by Louisa May Alcott, Herman Melville and Edith Wharton.

On Art

Doyle has written about the politics of emotion in contemporary art, art controversies, and the politics of gender and sexuality in art and literature. She has published essays on the following artists: Andy Warhol, Thomas Eakins, Tracey Emin, performance artists Vaginal Davis and Ron Athey, Carrie Mae Weems and James Luna. Her current project. “The Athletic Turn,” explores the recent and extensive turn toward sports in contemporary art and performance.